Art


#21

I do abstract with acrylic, and this is one of my favorites:

Pinwheel (acrylic on canvas, 24" x 30")

More recently doing more pouring techniques:

Multidimensional Highway (16" x 20")

And digital images:

Cosmic Mesh (digital, 3840 x 2160 pixels)


#22

Very cool
Have no idea how one does that stuff


#23

Thanks! It’s been a process of learning what works, as cliché as that sounds. I’ve determined I don’t do well with brushes, so it’s only sponges and painting knives. The pouring is all about preparing the paint in the right paint-to-medium ratio so that it flows correctly (and sometimes, getting the cellular structure to appear). It’s kind of a contained mess – or lack thereof I suppose.

For the digital one, it starts out as a simple black and white drawing with the lines that define the borders of the colors you see there, and vector graphics editing to make the lines into smooth curves. After putting in the color (the general pattern I usually come up with on the fly – but geometric symmetry/gradients are usually what I end up going for), I then apply various filters & blurring to get the look you see there.


#24

Here’s a really nice illustration be Mati Klarwein from the back of Miles’ Live Evil album.

This was the backside - evil side - he used a photo of J. Edgar Hoover as reference for this drag queen frog.


#25

I printed some proofs from this Jimi woodblock I’ve been working on.

And then I sprayed the block with water (I use water-based ink now)… When I was cleaning up I rolled newsprint on it and came up with some kind of psychedelic results.


#26

Nice results :slight_smile:


#27

Awesome


#28

Those are sweet, Dougo!


#29

I printed a woodblock I have been working on last night. A friend of mine gave me some foil paper that I printed some of them on. The subject is up for interpretation.


#30

I first thought it looked a human heart.


#31

This design has a lot of elements of figurative, anatomical and plant forms - but I tried to keep it as ambiguous as I could.

Here’s the block before printing.


#32

Rubbing from Wassily woodblock


#33

I love seeing this block. Can you post a pic of your tools when you get a chance?


#34

We have a client who does linoleum block prints. I assume much easier than wood. Her stuff is great too. Nice work, Dougo.


#35

Here’s a photo of one of my cutting tools next to a woodblock. I use a speedball hobby knife, usually the short rounded flat blade. Sometimes I use the V- shaped blade or a small chisel.

I use the same tools for carving linoleum, which is a little harder to carve than the redwood I use, but much more forgiving.

Anything is fair game, I use a pie crust cutter too sometimes to start patterns.


#36

Very cool!! Thank you.


#37

@DougoBlue

From your perspective, can you recommend a starter block cutting/printing kit? Want to get one as a gift, and I am not sure which items are important enough to have while starting, and which are just not useful. It will likely be used on lino blocks initially, I imagine.

Thanks in advance for the expert advice!

I’m looking at these two:

https://www.amazon.com/Speedball-Block-Printing-Tool-Kit/dp/B002MH5GFS/ref=pd_cp_21_2/144-0095547-0844940?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B002MH5GFS&pd_rd_r=8ee8ea89-e35d-4d37-8b1f-825f2bec4c54&pd_rd_w=j8vRP&pd_rd_wg=h0ELS&pf_rd_p=e44de6bb-cc27-4696-9c22-3a1bddefabbd&pf_rd_r=NBQZVMKEGK6QCYKTS3BA&psc=1&refRID=NBQZVMKEGK6QCYKTS3BA

https://www.dickblick.com/products/speedball-deluxe-block-printing-kit/


#38

Yes, either of those look good. The Dick Blick kit looks pretty nice and comes with some inks. Those speedball cutting tools are basically the same ones I use - and the one with the blue handle looks like a pretty identical carving tool. It looks like the Speedball kit comes with a Barron for printing, which would come in handy without a press.


#39

Here’s the first proof of Wassily


#40

I love the way you work with the grain.