Gear


#41

Monkey I never doubted you :lips::lips::lips:


#42

“James Taylor has a tuning method he created to address some of the tuning conflicts inherent in the guitar’s design. The thinking behind Taylor’s method is that hitting the strings harder causes them to vibrate sharp, so we actually need to tune the guitar slightly flat to compensate for this. The low strings have a greater tendency to sound sharp when played hard, so they need to be flatter relatively speaking. In addition, the B string, should be flatter relative to A440 than the high E and G.”

"Using Taylor’s method, each strings would be tuned several cents flat of A440 as such:

low E: -12 cents
A: -10
D: -8
G: -4
B: -6
E: -3


#43

That’s pretty cool!


#44

I think JT’s actually got a YouTube that packs this out


#45

It kind of implies that he has to hit the strings hard all the time. What happens if he softens up? He goes sharp?


#46

That was what I was thinking!

But then he probably has the luxury of a guitar tech who hands him a guitar tuned for each song.


#47

Tuning cents off only works if your attack is always the same. He strums. With a consistent force. His music has never been known for its dynamics. Unless you count its dynamite ability to work as a sleep aid.


#48

Yeah the whole thought of him hitting the strings hard is kind of funny.


#49

Sweet baby James made me want to fingerpick a guitar back when I was in high school.

I figured that’s the way chicks could be gotten.


#50

And was it?


#51

I didn’t learn to play for another eight years, by then that ship’d sailed.


#52

#53

Prisoner


#54

lol my old man taught me how to fingerpick the intro to damn near every James Taylor song when he was teaching me to fingerpick back in the day.


#55

Gear lol


#56

This arrived today. I put in a not-so-serious bid on eBay on Friday and it turns out I ‘won’.

I’m dubious about the terminology ‘winning bid’. It just means you were willing to pay more than anyone else. Is that winning? Or am I actually the biggest loser. No one else would touch it for the price.

Anyway turns out it’s ‘used’ but mint condition and I got it for 25% less than than the new price.

If you play a chord progression into it, it plays you a bass line and a drum part to suit right back at you. An automatic band in a box. The bass and drum parts it extrapolates from what you play and you can choose a range of genre styles and simpler and more involved versions at the turn of a knob. You can ‘teach’ it about 5 parts to each song: intro, verse, chorus, bridge, outro. And you can have it cycle through its parts on the kick switch.

Not a performance tool for me, but hoping it will inspire me to write different songs from the parts and rhythms it plays at me.

It also has a looper in it, but I’m not interested in that side of it. I hate those acts who set up and perform loops live. Yawn.


#57

Weird. I’d like to hear what you get out of it.


#58

Yeah sounds interesting. Let us know how it works out.


#59

This one is a performance tool however. I hate the way pickups make an acoustic guitar sound. Usually pretty artificial and crappy.

This box takes the vibrations from the pickup and, on the fly, translates them into what your acoustic would have sounded like if it were mic’d up in an isolated studio setting. Fishman have taken specific guitars into their studio and recorded them, matching the recordings to the pickup vibrations. That’s how it knows what the mic’d sound would be.

There are some guitar make specific mic’d sound models in this pedal, for like the classic Gibsons and Martins and others in various body sizes: jumbo, dreadnought, parlour, 12 sting, etc. And you can choose different mics too.

Anyway, you dial in the modelled sound, with maybe 50% pickup sound and 50% model sound and it makes your guitar sound so much more natural, nuanced and dynamic. If only I was a better player…

The box has got a tuner, eq, compressor, effects loop and other stuff built in, so it’s pretty useful. But most of all it takes the edge off that crappy pickup sound and helps me relax because the guitar actually sounds right live on a PA.

If your specific guitar isn’t modelled there are lots of guitars that are close enough, but if you want perfection you can even send Fishman yours in the mail and for $200 they will even record you a model specific to your actual guitar. With different mics.

Anyway I have been loading this one up today since I plan to do an open mic this week, work permitting.

EDIT: I saw a rig rundown video recently where Jason Isbell said he actually uses one of these too and says he can’t tell the model from a real guitar. I knew it sounded good to my untrained ears, but from someone so dialled in this is a reassuring endorsement.


#60

@inky @highlife

Here’s a fun review of the previous simpler version that might give you a sense